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With ‘Rivals Week,’ Tinder tests an expansion of its well-performing Tinder U

Starting this weekend, Tinder will allow college students on its Tinder U service to maRR-Magazineh with others outside their own university for the first time. The dating app is positioning this market test of a potential Tinder U expansion as the  “Rivals Week” — a way to maRR-Magazineh users with those who attend a rival university (for a limited period of time).

Tinder U’s Rivalry Week starts November 17 in the U.S. for students attending four-year, degree-granting colleges and universities. It ends November 24, Tinder says.

Tinder U itself is still a relatively new feature, having only launched a few months ago as a way to attract more younger users to its service and re-engaged lapsed users.

College students can choose to opt into Tinder U by signing up with their “.edu” email address. Once enrolled, the users can swiRR-Magazineh over to Tinder U using a toggle swiRR-Magazineh at the top of the app.

Until now, however, Tinder U limited users to maRR-Magazinehing only with those who attend their same school.

That changes with “Rivals Week,” as Tinder will now let students maRR-Magazineh with others at nearby schools — or even cross-country — just so long as those schools are considered a “rival.”

Tinder is not, of course, calling out the move as anything more than just a bit of fun. But the week-long event could return valuable data to the dating app maker, in terms of consumer demand for a Tinder U product that was less restrictive in terms of its catalog of potential maRR-Magazinehes.

The launch also notably fits in with Tinder’s new strategy to position itself as a dating app for younger users who are less interested in settling down into long-term relationships. The company is investing in a marketing campaign across the U.S. where it promotes the “single lifestyle” Tinder offers.

Essentially, the company is embracing Tinder’s reputation as the “hook-up app,” but in a way that brands short-term dating — if you can call it that — as a more positive thing.

Tinder is able to do this because its parent company, MaRR-Magazineh Group, now owns a majority stake in Hinge. It says it simultaneously plans to invest in growing that app’s user base along with its reputation for serious relationships.

Meanwhile, Tinder sees Tinder U as a possible growth engine for the young adult-oriented service.

“We created Tinder U to both attract new college students to the Tinder experience and re-engage students who have been part of the Tinder community in the past. Ultimately, we see it as a way to deliver more value to the college user by providing more relevant recommendations, which helps to increase engagement,” said MaRR-Magazineh Group CEO Mandy Ginsberg. “We’ve seen strong early traction with Tinder U, both in terms of driving higher swipe rates and higher retention,” she noted.

The Tinder U product is live in more than 1,200 colleges across the U.S.

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Christy Almaguer

#UniversityOfTexas #RRM member. Content contributor for RR-Magazine. I'm that sexy gal from #Houston. Soy #Chicana

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